SimplyScripts Discussion Board
Blog Home - Produced Movie Script Library - TV Scripts - Unproduced Scripts - Contact - Site Map
ScriptSearch
Welcome, Guest.
It is December 16th, 2018, 9:02am
Please login or register.
Was PortalRecent PostsHome Help Calendar Search Register Login
If you wish to join this discussion board, please send me a message. Please do read the guidelines that govern behavior on the discussion board. It will make for a much more pleasant experience for everyone. A word about SimplyScripts and Censorship


Scripts Studios are posting for award consideration
October OWC Who Wrote What and Writers Choice
And the Hyper Epic pick is...

The Night Gallery 7WC Scripts

Short Script of the Day | Featured Script of the Month | Featured Short Scripts Available for Production | Submit Your Script

How do I get my film's link and banner here?
All screenplays on the simplyscripts.com and simplyscripts.net domain are copyrighted to their respective authors. All rights reserved. This screenplaymay not be used or reproduced for any purpose including educational purposes without the expressed written permission of the author.
Forum Login
Username: Create a new Account
Password:     Forgot Password

SimplyScripts Screenwriting Discussion Board    General Boards    Questions or Comments  ›  Presenting a Script Process Question
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 1 Guests

 Pages: 1
Recommend Print
  Author    Presenting a Script Process Question  (currently 577 views)
Doug6388
Posted: February 28th, 2018, 7:21pm Report to Moderator
Red


I have my Academy Acceptance Speech finished

Location
Vancouver BC Canada
Posts
1
Posts Per Day
0.00
I am a newbie.  I have read i/you should not send unsolicited screenplays to lawyers, management or agents without having a (C), WGA register or "Blurt" at a producer, but it is OK to enter a competition, ask other writers to critique the whole screenplay and send query ltrs or email to those same people with a Concept / Elevator Pitch or Synopsis 2 pg ?  Have I missed any steps?  Just curious
Logged Offline
Private Message
AnthonyCawood
Posted: March 1st, 2018, 4:18am Report to Moderator
Yellow



Location
UK
Posts
2664
Posts Per Day
1.43
Doug not sure what you mean here by process... but I'll try and answer/help based on my knowledge/experience and on the understanding that you seem to be asking about both how to get your script to people and the risk of said material being copied or otherwise ripped off.

You are granted Copyright by the act of creation of an artistic work, proving this is sometimes the issue so people often use WGA Registration or Library of Congress etc to provide proof that you created and importantly, when.

Unsolicited screenplays to anyone gatekeeper is usually frowned upon unless you already know that they are open to such approaches. The reasons are that they get inundated with material and probably won't look at it anyway - so you are wasting your time. The other reason they won't look at it is to avoid any claims down the line that they copied someone else's work.

Normal form if you want to contact gatekeepers that you do not have a relationship with is to send them a query letter, briefly explain who you are, what your script is (logline etc) and ask them if they'd be interested in taking a read. But this isn't a two page pitch type thing, again probably too much and reveals maybe more of your concept than would be right for an initial query... though they may ask for this down the line.

Competitions, yep, fine... entering does provide some evidence that you had script XYZ at entry date, though I've never heard of this actually coming up.

Asking other writers to critique, well if you mean on a site like this... then again you are putting your script on a site, some evidence of your script existing at that point in time. Personal interactions you'd have email but not sure how helpful that'd be.

I've written a bunch of articles that might help with some of this - https://anthonycawood.wordpress.com/category/articles/

On the subject of having your scripts ripped off... well it is very rare but does occasionally happen. Two things to note... an idea can't be copyrighted, just the execution. So the idea of your script could appear in another film and be pure co-incidence, Characters, blocks of dialogue, complete plot copying and that sort of thing can lead to lawyers getting involved BUT it is still not cut and dried.

It's a catch 22, you want to get your scripts out there but you don't want them to be plagiarised. Personally, I register my scripts with Write Vault as proof of when I finished that particular script but beyond that I don't worry about it as it's hard enough to get people to read features without paranoia holding you back.

Hope that helps a little.


Anthony Cawood - Award winning screenwriter
Available Short screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/short-scripts
Available Feature screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/feature-film-scripts/
Screenwriting articles - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/articles
IMDB Link - http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6495672/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1
Logged Offline
Site Private Message Reply: 1 - 10
eldave1
Posted: March 1st, 2018, 10:59am Report to Moderator
Yellow



Location
Southern California
Posts
3856
Posts Per Day
2.41
I concur with Anthony here.  

The other thing to add is that unknown amateurs (like me at least) are not likely to have our scripts stolen by a Producer since we come so cheap anyway.

You're more likely IMO to have your script stolen by a wannabe writer - BUT - if you want to be in the biz, I see little choice but to get your script exposure (i.e., unless you are producing your own).


My Scripts can all be seen here:

http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts
Logged Offline
Site Private Message Reply: 2 - 10
MarkRenshaw
Posted: March 5th, 2018, 8:20am Report to Moderator
Yellow



Location
UK
Posts
1420
Posts Per Day
0.69
I would say always protect your work before you send it out there. Always put Copyright (and the year if you want) plus a note on the title page saying this work cannot be used or reproduced without the express permission of the author.

Best method is to then register it with the Library of Congress, which is what I do.

Cheapest method is to send a hard copy to yourself via the postal service and keep it in the envelope. This is in effect the proof of the date you registered the copyright. You can also enter it into a few competitions online so there's a digital signature as well.

At the end of the day though, if someone wants to steal your work, they can. It's quite hard for unknowns to prove otherwise. It's best to just try and get your work out there so you have a chance of NOT being an unknown lol.


For more of my scripts, stories, produced movies and the ocassional blog, check out my new website. CLICK
Logged Offline
Site Private Message Reply: 3 - 10
HyperMatt
Posted: March 5th, 2018, 12:31pm Report to Moderator
Purple



Location
London, UK
Posts
412
Posts Per Day
0.64
I saw an interesting interview of a producer on YouTube. Wish I could remember the title.
He was talking about the indications of an amateur when he gets a spec script, one of them is putting the WGA number on the front. Or any copywright blurb.
He was arguing that when you do this, it creates a 'hands off' mentality on the first page, and it is like saying that 'my work is so good and so profound that don't you dare steal it'.

I thought it was a fair point.


Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 4 - 10
eldave1
Posted: March 5th, 2018, 12:53pm Report to Moderator
Yellow



Location
Southern California
Posts
3856
Posts Per Day
2.41

Quoted from HyperMatt
I saw an interesting interview of a producer on YouTube. Wish I could remember the title.
He was talking about the indications of an amateur when he gets a spec script, one of them is putting the WGA number on the front. Or any copywright blurb.
He was arguing that when you do this, it creates a 'hands off' mentality on the first page, and it is like saying that 'my work is so good and so profound that don't you dare steal it'.

I thought it was a fair point.


I've seen that advise (in several places)  as well - seemed silly too me. They know you're a writer and as such should have an interest in protecting your script. Why would they not think - hey. this writer doesn't care to protect their script - must be crap.


My Scripts can all be seen here:

http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts
Logged Offline
Site Private Message Reply: 5 - 10
AnthonyCawood
Posted: March 5th, 2018, 2:20pm Report to Moderator
Yellow



Location
UK
Posts
2664
Posts Per Day
1.43
As mentioned, copyright is part of the act of creation, a producer or director with any experience/scruples already knows and understands that.

So what you are really talking about is protecting yourself against the unscrupulous or inexperienced.

For the inexperienced, students and the like... then the Paragraph about 'not to be used without express consent' type thing could work to prevent them using your script.

I'd personally suggest that this only really happens in the case of short scripts, not many inexperienced/students can even attempt a feature. So the paragraph may be useful on short scripts.

Leaving the unscrupulous...

I'm afraid here they won't be put off by a copyright statement, they already know it is. Here's where you need something that would provide proof that you are the original author. Here, WGA, LOC, competition entries, Write Vault etc will all help - I think the days of the sealed envelope are behind us though. But this will hopefully never be tested!

Personally, I register everything with Write Vault to get a timestamp and proof of when I wrote the actual script in question (they store a copy)... I don't do the paragraph thing but I've had my shorts made by students on 5 separate occasions without my permission - so maybe I should.


Anthony Cawood - Award winning screenwriter
Available Short screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/short-scripts
Available Feature screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/feature-film-scripts/
Screenwriting articles - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/articles
IMDB Link - http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6495672/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1
Logged Offline
Site Private Message Reply: 6 - 10
Dustin
Posted: March 5th, 2018, 3:40pm Report to Moderator
Blue


Action speaks louder than dialogue.

Posts
4816
Posts Per Day
2.44
I've never paid for copyright, nor paid to register a script with any type of service. Never done me any harm. I've never paid for phone insurance either... so much so that were I to lose my phone, with the money I've saved not buying phone insurance I could likely buy another 4.
Logged
Private Message Reply: 7 - 10
RJP
Posted: March 5th, 2018, 8:36pm Report to Moderator
Red


Posts
81
Posts Per Day
0.27

Quoted from Dustin
I've never paid for copyright, nor paid to register a script with any type of service. Never done me any harm. I've never paid for phone insurance either... so much so that were I to lose my phone, with the money I've saved not buying phone insurance I could likely buy another 4.


There's a difference between a phone and your script though. Your script is potentially worth half a million dollars.

There's some talk going around that James Franco stole The Disaster Artist from one of his students (Yes Franco apparently is a professor at a university). Well, he bought it off him for only 5000 bucks and then after a rewrite, gave him zero credit on the film. The student is suing Franco but having his original script registered with WGA would help his case.
Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 8 - 10
Dustin
Posted: March 6th, 2018, 3:01am Report to Moderator
Blue


Action speaks louder than dialogue.

Posts
4816
Posts Per Day
2.44

Quoted from RJP


There's some talk going around that James Franco stole The Disaster Artist from one of his students (Yes Franco apparently is a professor at a university). Well, he bought it off him for only 5000 bucks and then after a rewrite, gave him zero credit on the film. The student is suing Franco but having his original script registered with WGA would help his case.


Just as it would help his case if he had a digital signature, like sending the script to Franco through email.

I have ghostwritten a script for less than 5k. Albeit a different area completely. I don't think I'd be so happy selling one of my own ideas for that price. Right now I'm working on a drama as a secondary writer even though I am the primary/only. I'm doing it because I'm being paid... and also because it has genuine legs and could help me to the next level.

I don't know the ins and outs of this 5k deal, every deal is different. Could it be that this kid knew what he was getting into from the beginning?
Logged
Private Message Reply: 9 - 10
RJP
Posted: March 6th, 2018, 2:36pm Report to Moderator
Red


Posts
81
Posts Per Day
0.27

Quoted from Dustin


Just as it would help his case if he had a digital signature, like sending the script to Franco through email.

I have ghostwritten a script for less than 5k. Albeit a different area completely. I don't think I'd be so happy selling one of my own ideas for that price. Right now I'm working on a drama as a secondary writer even though I am the primary/only. I'm doing it because I'm being paid... and also because it has genuine legs and could help me to the next level.

I don't know the ins and outs of this 5k deal, every deal is different. Could it be that this kid knew what he was getting into from the beginning?


Yeah who knows. Having the script registered with WGA might expose that there isn't a word from his original script that was used. I'm not sure who's screwing who. Apparently his lawsuit states that Franco promised him a credit on the film.

Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 10 - 10
 Pages: 1
Recommend Print

Locked Board Board Index    Questions or Comments  [ previous | next ] Switch to:
Was Portal Recent Posts Home Help Calendar Search Register Login

Forum Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post polls
You may not post attachments
HTML is on
Blah Code is on
Smilies are on


Powered by E-Blah Platinum 9.71B © 2001-2006