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SimplyScripts Screenwriting Discussion Board    Screenwriting Discussion    Screenwriting Class  ›  So, you got an email about your script... Moderators: George Willson
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  Author    So, you got an email about your script...  (currently 11157 views)
Shelton
Posted: October 7th, 2009, 6:41pm Report to Moderator
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There have been a number of threads around here lately where a member of the board has gotten an email from a producer about the use of the script, and they're not exactly sure what to do or how to respond.  

So, after a little bit of behind the scenes discussion, we've decided to start this thread, which will serve as the go to source for all things related to the optioning, selling, and lending of your script.

I'm pretty much going to be laying out things from my own experiences in this post, and others are free to leave comments based on their own experiences, as it will definitely assist those in making the best decision related to their situation.  

Please make special note of my use of the word "experiences".  The best way to help is via first hand knowledge, and smart assed, half cocked comments won't be tolerated here.  There are plenty of other places for goofiness around here without pissing all over the whole reason most of us are here.  To sell and/or get produced.

With that being said, here's a brief idea of what you can expect when approached regarding a short script.

1.)  To respond to the email, only to never hear from that person again...EVER.

It may seem odd, but this happens a lot.  I'm not sure if it's because someone decided to tie one on one night, thought they could produce a script, then thought better of it the next day when they were sober or what, but this happens with a fair percentage of inquiries.  They disappear just as quickly and randomly as they appear.

2.)  You'll receive a writing credit.

This goes without saying, and has never been an issue with anything that I've allowed the use of, but this is something that needs to be addressed in that initial email.  You get your credit, because after all, you're probably allowing this script to be used for free.  Which brings me to my next point.

3.)  Do NOT expect to be paid.

Short films are generally nothing more than student films being done for a mid or end of year project, or an exposure piece for the people involved.  Any money available is going toward the actual production of the film.  Not the director, not the actors, and most certainly not you.

An exception to this rule is if you're approached concerning the rights.  If someone wants the exclusive rights to your script, you should get something.  It will probably be of small value, but at least you get some sort of compensation for giving up your work.  This, however, is at the sole discretion of the writer.  If the filmmaker has provided samples of previous work that looks to be of good quality, you can have faith that a good product will be turned out, and the potential for exposure will outweigh that of a couple hundred dollars.  Your call.

My approach is that I retain the rights to my work, then after looking at the finished product decide if I want to allow anyone else to use it.  I find it guards against flakes and allows me to see my work produced in the best manner possible.  Speaking of finished product...

4.)  Insist that a copy of the film be made available to you.

Whether it be dvd or a site like YouTube or Vimeo, you deserve to see your work in some capacity.  Just like getting writing credit, this is pretty much a no-brainer, but it needs to be put out there.  It's never been an issue for me, and it's not too much of an inconvenience for a filmmaker to spend a little upload time or postage money to send a copy to the person that gave them a free script.

5.)  Ask about the timeline.

Is this going to be shot and edited within the next couple weeks, or is the filmmaker going to wait until Fall because the script will look better visually once the leaves change?  Find out.  Filmmaking is a long, tedious process, and if you know the timeline in advance, it will save you from sending a lot of impatient emails wondering if the film is done and not a single frame has been shot.  Which takes me back to my first point...

A filmmaker can disappear just as easily in the middle or end of the process as they can in the beginning.  If you happen to send a few emails requesting a status update with no response, assume they've moved on to something else.  At which point you should do the same.

That's about it for now.  I'll eventually come back and edit this to include things related to features (a whole other animal), but this should take care of the really pressing questions for now.


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Andrew
Posted: October 7th, 2009, 6:50pm Report to Moderator
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Nice one, Mike.

This is definitely the way forward.

Phil's comments from this thread, I suggest as sound advice also.

The dog's comments:

Tell the filmmaker (should you choose to have him make it) that you have the following conditions:

1.  You get two copies of the finished film.
2.  You get sole credit as writer.
3.  Any changes in the script must be made by you, or with your permission.
4.  You want the write to reproduce and distribute the finished product for personal use.

Andrew


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dogglebe
Posted: October 7th, 2009, 7:41pm Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Shelton
1.)  To respond to the email, only to never hear from that person again...EVER.

It may seem odd, but this happens a lot.  I'm not sure if it's because someone decided to tie one on one night, thought they could produce a script, then thought better of it the next day when they were sober or what, but this happens with a fair percentage of inquiries.  They disappear just as quickly and randomly as they appear.


This happens quite a bit (atleast from my experience). One short I wrote was produced by the thirteenth filmmaker who asked for it.  The other twelve just disappeared.




Quoted from Shelton
4.)  Insist that a copy of the film be made available to you.

Whether it be dvd or a site like YouTube or Vimeo, you deserve to see your work in some capacity.  Just like getting writing credit, this is pretty much a no-brainer, but it needs to be put out there.  It's never been an issue for me, and it's not too much of an inconvenience for a filmmaker to spend a little upload time or postage money to send a copy to the person that gave them a free script.


I disagree with the youtube and vimeo part, here.  You should receive a high quality copy of the film on dvd. Youtube compresses the files; you don't want that.  Vimeo cannot send out a DVD copy.

Ask for a hard copy.  Shipping a disc or two isn't that big of an expense.


You should ask the filmmaker if he/she has any experience in filmmaking.  You may not want to have your script shot by a first timer.  Asking to see any previous work should not pose a problem.

This thread should be a sticky thread (if it's not already).



Phil
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Shelton
Posted: October 7th, 2009, 7:49pm Report to Moderator
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I covered both routes with the copy scenario just to give people an idea of what to ask for.  

I normally ask for a dvd copy, then upload it to a private Vimeo page if the filmmaker decides to hold off on posting it to the general public for awhile.  By going that route, I have easy access to show it to others.  Some aren't as up on how to go about doing that, so having it made available online cuts that part out of the equation for them.


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bert
Posted: October 7th, 2009, 7:49pm Report to Moderator
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Quoted from dogglebe
This thread should be a sticky thread (if it's not already).


That's the plan, Phil.

After some collaboration amongst the mods, we figured it would be easier to have a permanent "home" for this sort of information.

And to anybody reading -- when another one of those threads pops up from an excited member who has received their first email -- please refer them to this thread.

Hopefully, we can minimize a bit of clutter.

And please, try to keep idle chatter to a minimum.  

But if you have some real-life experiences, expertise, and advice to share, that is welcome.

Features, like Mike said, are a more complex beast that will be discussed later.


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Breanne Mattson
Posted: October 7th, 2009, 9:50pm Report to Moderator
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Thanks for starting this thread.

I ask for writing credit and a copy of the completed film for certain. As far as revisions, it depends on when they plan to shoot versus what I have going on. I usually discuss possible changes with them and work out whether Iíll do them or whether they can do them. Usually I find they would prefer that I do them. I try to work with them as much as possible.

Also, I always ask prospective filmmakers about their future plans. I encourage filmmakers to enter the film into festivals or whatever they can do to gain exposure. Iíve had student filmmakers ask to produce my work as a learning experience and Iím fine with that but other than that, it seems generally pointless to me to make a film with no intentions. I look at it as an investment in a future filmmaker as well as the potential for a mutually beneficial relationship in the future.


Breanne




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steven8
Posted: October 7th, 2009, 9:53pm Report to Moderator
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I have been contacted three times by email, and each time the person just disappeared into thin air.  Each one was a college person doing a project, and my assumption was that they found another script they'd rather do.  I was bummed at first, but you can't let it get you down.  
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Breanne Mattson
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Quoted from steven8
I have been contacted three times by email, and each time the person just disappeared into thin air.  Each one was a college person doing a project, and my assumption was that they found another script they'd rather do.  I was bummed at first, but you can't let it get you down.  


Steven, it may not be that they would rather do something different. A surprising number of things can kill a film in preproduction. It could be as simple as that the actor they had to play the lead character backed out and now they have an actor who doesnít fit your script. It could be that they lost access to a location. Some movies get made merely because a particular location is available. It may be nothing personal.

Also, sometimes the person is just busy. Iíve gone long periods of time with no correspondence from a filmmaker and then got contacted out of the blue and found out the film just got completed.


Breanne



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sniper
Posted: October 8th, 2009, 1:25am Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Breanne Mattson
Also, sometimes the person is just busy. Iíve gone long periods of time with no correspondence from a filmmaker and then got contacted out of the blue and found out the film just got completed.

Amen to that. I received an email last week containing only a YouTube link to a short film made from one of my scripts. The first (and only) contact I had with the director was about 5-6 months ago.

Now, getting a script produced is always nice...but I told this guy NO from the start. The script he wanted to produce had already been produce at that time so I told him "thanks but no thanks blah blah blah".

And then I get an email last week containing only a YouTube link. Go figure. I don't really want to do anything about it cos' it's simply beneath me but he did make me look like a two-timing scumbag.


Down in the hole / Jesus tries to crack a smile / Beneath another shovel load
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Murphy
Posted: October 8th, 2009, 1:56am Report to Moderator
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Being the miserable old git that I am I would just add that do not get too excited when you receive the email. That is much harder then it sounds, especially when it is your first. But trust me you will avoid the likely slump that follows when you realise your script is not being filmed after all.

Also be very careful about agreeing to change your script just to get it filmed, especially if you have no assurances that it will actually be made. It is too easy to be so eager to have your script produced that you will agree to something you might not actually want to do. Again, it is something you may well regret later. You may well be better not making the changes and waiting for someone who wants to film your script as you intended.

Both of these are lessons I learned the hard way, and I still not have any of my shorts produced (although to be fair I have not written one for a long long time).

Fairly recently I came closer than ever to have something produced, and it was even supposed to have some decent money behind it. But yet again another one that fell through the cracks and it can be very disappointing.


On a more positive note however if this email is genuine and you do get a script filmed then get your arse on Simply Scripts and tell us all, show us the film as soon as you can and do some showing off. You deserve it!



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mcornetto
Posted: October 8th, 2009, 3:48am Report to Moderator
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Thank you Shelton for starting such an informative thread and for taking a balanced approach in your advice.  Each person is going to want something slightly different when they get their script solicited and I think you covered a few different scenarios.  

Personally, what I ask for is writing credit, a copy of the film on DVD and a percentage of profit.  I'm not likely to get any money from it but it's there anyway just in case.

I don't care about rewrites or how they want to change it.  If I'm feeling wary about someone doing a good job with it, I ask that I get to see the film before they put my name on the credits.

When asked by students if they can make one of my films, I give them an educational license.  This allows them to make the film and show it in an educational setting but it must not be distributed or shown in any other circumstances.  This means no YouTube and no Festivals.


  
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dogglebe
Posted: October 8th, 2009, 7:05am Report to Moderator
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Quoted from sniper

Amen to that. I received an email last week containing only a YouTube link to a short film made from one of my scripts. The first (and only) contact I had with the director was about 5-6 months ago.

Now, getting a script produced is always nice...but I told this guy NO from the start. The script he wanted to produce had already been produce at that time so I told him "thanks but no thanks blah blah blah".

And then I get an email last week containing only a YouTube link. Go figure. I don't really want to do anything about it cos' it's simply beneath me but he did make me look like a two-timing scumbag.


I had this problem once.  I contacted youtube and had the video taken down.


Phil

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Barry_Katz
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Great thread, thank you all for contributing!  Can permission be granted simply by stating the terms in an email, or should a physical "agreement form" be signed and dated by both parties?


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Shelton
Posted: October 8th, 2009, 8:26am Report to Moderator
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Permission can be granted via email if it's just a simple usage agreement.  If you're going into something more involved like a sale or exclusive rights, it's best to get that on paper in some capacity.


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Xavier
Posted: October 8th, 2009, 8:02pm Report to Moderator
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No one has ever offered to pay me... EVER.

And plus, most of these guys out there who ask to make your script are full of it, they say they will but are too lazy to ever get off the ground... most of them anyways. Personal experience.

Out of about eight people who offered to make my scripts only about three have actually gone through with it.

If I could give a tip, it would be, keep a close eye on the project and check in with them every week so that you know what's going on.


Those who believe that they are the best, the most popular, the go to guy, those are usually the ones who need the most help.
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alffy
Posted: October 9th, 2009, 9:50am Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Xavier
If I could give a tip, it would be, keep a close eye on the project and check in with them every week so that you know what's going on.


This is nice in theory but you'll probably find the producer is very busy and after the initial few contacts they will disappear for a while.  Post production takes an age and you may go months without hearing anything.  Just wait and they will get back to you when it's done....hopefully.


Check out my scripts...if you want to, no pressure.

You can find my scripts here
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bert
Posted: October 9th, 2009, 9:59am Report to Moderator
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Quoted from alffy
Post production takes an age and you may go months without hearing anything.


Very good point, Alffy.  Xavier's post is actually poor advice -- but since we are discussing it -- I suppose it makes more sense to leave it up than to delete it.

If you badger a producer with weekly emails, they will probably be very unlikely to seek you out again.

Patience in all things related to production is a virtue.


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dogglebe
Posted: October 9th, 2009, 7:36pm Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Xavier
No one has ever offered to pay me... EVER.


A lot of times, the writer is offered a percentage of the profits.  Very rarely, unfortunately, do shorts make a dime.  They're more of a business card than a paycheck.



Quoted from Xavier
Out of about eight people who offered to make my scripts only about three have actually gone through with it.


I had a dozen people ask to film one of my scripts.  The thirteenth actually filmed it.



Quoted from Xavier
If I could give a tip, it would be, keep a close eye on the project and check in with them every week so that you know what's going on.


Every week?  That's a great way to piss someone off.

You have to remember that anyone who is shooting your film is, more than likely, not a full time filmmaker.  Most of the people involved in the production will be doing it pro bono.  This means that things get done when everyone is available for it.  If the guy with the camera (or the car) is unavailable, then nothing gets done.  And shooting is likely done on weekends.

I wouldn't e-mail people more than one a month.  If you piss them off enough, you'll give them a reason to abandon your script.


Phil
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Xavier
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Quoted from alffy

Post production takes an age and you may go months without hearing anything.  Jus


I actually know quite a bit about filmmaking, I know that post production is the most difficult part of filmmaking, but still, if you did what I did, and not even check up once, you'll find that you loose contact with them forever.


Quoted from bert

Xavier's post is actually very poor advice


Sorry you feel that way, but face it, for a lot of beginning screenwriters and filmmakers, you have to keep contact. And it's not badgering someone if you leave one e-mail a week. What some websites do is badgering, but not that.


Quoted from dogglebe

I had a dozen people ask to film one of my scripts. The thirteenth actually made it.


Good for you. That's something you can tell people, "keep your hopes up" with. But my case, out of the several people who ask to make my script, the only one who really did, never asked me in thr first place, I just got an e-mail that said, "I made your script into a film, I'll send you a copy." By the way, I still haven't gotten that copy.



Those who believe that they are the best, the most popular, the go to guy, those are usually the ones who need the most help.
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DarrenJamesSeeley
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Quoted from Xavier


Sorry you feel that way, but face it, for a lot of beginning screenwriters and filmmakers, you have to keep contact. And it's not badgering someone if you leave one e-mail a week. What some websites do is badgering, but not that.



I recently had contact with a film student from Australia regarding a short script of mine. Thinks are looking pretty serious. It's only a student film thesis, nobody's going to make a ton of money.

When he first inquired about the script?  It was a good month before I heard back from him.  Requests come and go.  I even heard from him today, as he asked for a one page (that's after he already chose to do it, which is a good sign) and I gave it to him.

I do believe in communication and updates in progress, things of that nature.
But---I don't believe in knocking on his door every week either. Way I see it, if he's open to communication, that's great. But he's reaching out to me when he can, and I respect that.

I say, then, in stages of prep, production and post, let the filmmaker(s) contact you, and not you them.







"I know you want to work for Mo Fuzz. And Mo Fuzz wants you to. But first, I'm going to need to you do something for me... on spec." - Mo Fuzz, Tapeheads, 1988
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mattman2900
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I had quite a few emails from producers. Some claimed to big name producers and name dropped like the dickens only to vanish into vast wasted space that is the back page of the script.  

The more consistent producers have been smaller companies that are interested, but have yet to work out timelines and all that other jazz, though at least they were in constant communication.

I also few producers that I'll occasionally hear from to say their interested and then months of silence go by and then they contact me out of the blue again to say their interested, but then more months go by with more silence.  

I opted to go the route of producing one feature myself, and searched for an exec and we were all ready to go and the exec backed out the other day for a bigger project.  So back to square one.

One short I wrote on here a few contacted me to film it - I believe at least one was a student filmmaker and asked for the timeline of completion and he said he'd get me the info - never heard from him again.  

I check up with producers I know that a really interested maybe once every two-three months.  I think quarterly communication is okay. A couple have told me they meant to get back to me sooner but had to drop my project for something else.  Which is fine.  In this industry no response usually means no (Of course there are exceptions to that) and I always keep the door open, because who knows their other projects might fall through and then go back through their records and go "Oh that guy was nice, and his material was solid, lets see if it's still available."



Pretty used to the disappearing acts by now, so unless I hear a recognizable name on other end I'm not all that excited - until I can understand where they want to take the project.
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dogglebe
Posted: January 11th, 2011, 9:09pm Report to Moderator
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Once I agree to let someone produce something of mine, I contact them one a month; a quick how-ya-doing?  This is how I find out if they dropped the project for another.  No one's ever made first contact, saying they've dropped the script; it's in response to how-ya-doing.


Phil
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maximillian
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G'day,

I guess this is only tangentally related, but how would you suggest writing an email asking a copyright holder for adaptation rights? I've written a draft that is structured thus; My initial enquiry, a summation of the plot and my goals for the script.

Do you think this is a good format or am I missing something?

Cya
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Mr. Blonde
Posted: May 16th, 2012, 9:34am Report to Moderator
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I haven't had to do something like this for a while, but I actually have a question. Someone E-mailed me, interested in "Christmas Story". You probably know the deal. But, things got a little complicated in a hurry.

Now, do we know anything about "The Global Artist Agency Group" and/or their subsidiary "Global Talent Agency" besides what I read, that they're entirely online-based and that they have a handful of employees? Basically, I'm wondering if they're a known scam or anything like that.

I bring this up because of a conversation I had (actually still having) with a gentleman named Chase Craig.

Everything started normal. He gave me a very brief introduction and said he would like to speak to me about producing it. Pretty standard start so I basically ask what kind of questions he had.

Here, he asks me if I have a budget, studio or cast behind this script. He kind of threw me a curveball here because when he came to me about producing it, I took it to mean he was interested whereas it seems like he was interested in me producing it. So, I went the simple route and explained that as a writer, the spec script is virtually my only responsibility at the moment.

He seemed to understand what I was getting at, but he mentioned that "just before I hop on with this, I need to know everything about what you have." He continued with his understanding that all I have is the script, but he does imply (imply being used very loosely) certain interests. He says he's interested in producing, starring and directing. At this point, I am quite curious because all I can think is we have nothing yet. He mentions we can both talk to his agent (the plot thickens) about getting a studio behind this and he admits (which was always obvious to me) that this is not a summer movie, but a small release, at best.

Seeing as how he seems to be getting ahead of himself, I remind him that this is hardly a first draft and that I have nothing else set up so I ask if I could speak directly to his agent as it should be the agent's job to do their bidding and I'd feel more comfortable speaking to them.

So, about an hour and a half later, he comes back at me mentioning that he believes in the script and that he'd just need a studio behind it... which is a monolith on its own and he sends me a resumť.

In the resumť is a whole lot of stuff, sort of. He gives me what he looks like, what he's performed, his training, his skills and his representation. In my searching, I haven't been able to verify anything he's said yet, but that's not to say that he's lying.

So, basically I'm contemplating contacting (or trying to) his agent by the phone number given or trying to E-mail him. Does everyone think this is a good play or is there a better way to do this?

Any help would be appreciated.


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Shelton
Posted: May 16th, 2012, 11:58am Report to Moderator
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Not too keen on what I've read regarding your conversation.  If he's interested in producing your script, then he should know that it would fall on him to get a budget, studio and cast in place.  Looks to me like he's just trying to get involved in something that may already be in the works, and he doesn't have the cred to put his name on something as "token" producer.

Contacting the agent will most likely get you nowhere, since you'll probably get nothing more than an inquiry about what you're offering.  At best, you'd get an LOI, but that's not really enough to get you anything more beyond that since their main function is to attract investors and other potential talent.


Shelton's Website

Shelton's IMDb Profile

"I think I did pretty well, considering I started out with nothing but a bunch of blank paper." - Steve Martin
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Mr. Blonde
Posted: May 16th, 2012, 1:01pm Report to Moderator
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It was one of those things where at one point, I had to stop and make sure the guy was serious. I mean, from what he lists in his resume, all he's done is acting and limited amounts from what I've seen. All of a sudden jumping to producer, director and star struck me as extremely odd.

After I had sent the message, I was just going to send an E-mail reiterating that I'd prefer for his agent to contact me directly even though, like you said, that's not really their prime concern.

I guess the thing I'm most confused by is why I'd be messaged by an actor. Of all people involved in making a movie, an actor contacting a writer is about as backwards as it gets. Just one of those things I suppose.


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ajr
Posted: May 16th, 2012, 4:03pm Report to Moderator
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Hey Sean,

I don't see anyone with that name listed on IMDB pro so I wonder about the credits. Global Artists is the real deal though and they rep some talent that I'm sure everyone's heard of, like Tom Sizemore, Gary Busey and Steven Bauer.

AJR


Click HERE to read JOHN LENNON'S HEAVEN https://preview.tinyurl.com/John-Lennon-s-Heaven-110-pgs/
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Mr. Blonde
Posted: May 16th, 2012, 4:17pm Report to Moderator
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Anthony, do you mind if I E-mail you exactly what he sent me to see what you think?


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ajr
Posted: May 16th, 2012, 10:01pm Report to Moderator
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Sure, PM me and I'll send you my e-mail address.


Click HERE to read JOHN LENNON'S HEAVEN https://preview.tinyurl.com/John-Lennon-s-Heaven-110-pgs/
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Breanne Mattson
Posted: May 17th, 2012, 11:22am Report to Moderator
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I assume this is the guy:

http://www.starnow.com/chasecraig

In the above link, his agency is listed as Global Talent Agency. Iím sure itís just a talent agency that provides actors. In other words, their clients are the people seeking actors, not the actors themselves, as with major Hollywood agencies.

I think Mikeís probably got it right. Itís probably an actor wanting to get in on a project.

I occasionally get emails out of the blue from actors. I have no idea how they got my address or why they think I would be able to help them. I also get emails from people working in other areas of the industry, like composers or whatever.

I think theyíre just doing whatever they can to get into a movie.


Breanne


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jagan@spundana.org
Posted: May 24th, 2012, 3:49pm Report to Moderator
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Breanne,
All that is pretty genuine, he is just a young actor trying to break into the bigger scene maybe. The Global Talent Agency is very legit and I have spoken to the gentleman who owns it, John Epstein and he is a fine person too. Chase Craig might also be very much a genuine person, young actor and talented. So, I think you have no worries communicating with him. I hope this helps. Sincerely. J.R.
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TheUsualSuspect
Posted: December 23rd, 2012, 3:04am Report to Moderator
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I guess I should have asked for a contract to be signed.

In any event, someone did email me about the very first script I ever posted here, I agreed to let them do it as long as I receive a finished copy and writing credit.

Only....they changed the dialogue, entirely. I guess they were more interested in the idea and not what the characters had to say. Problem is, they completely changed the story around by changing their dialogue. Instead of character A saying earth shattering news, it's character B, which changes the entire tone of the script.

I did get writing credit, but they but the director's name on their too, since he did the dialogue. Who knows, maybe the FINISHED copy with just say STORY BY......


A Picture Is Worth

If you want me to read your script, send me a link.
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AmbitionIsKey
Posted: June 4th, 2013, 4:14am Report to Moderator
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So, found this thread, thought I'd drop a post and get an opinion off some of you guys.

I had a filmmaker from Orlando contact me in regards to a short on this board.  He wanted to produce it.  Basically, I did a quick Google search of his e-mail and name and found out he had his own website, he'd also shot a music vidoe in Haiti.  He's legit, I'm sure.

We came to an agreement.  He sent me a "contract" of sorts to sign, I made some changes to it so that it fitted both us, and he agreed to the new terms.  I printed off two copies of the agreement.

I signed and dated two.  And my parent (because I'm under eighteen) signed and dated both.  Then, the next day, I sent them off to the director's address in Florida with a hard-copy of the short in the package.

That was ten days ago I sent the package.  I was just wondering how long is the norm for a package to go from the UK to the US?  He told me he'd contact me when the package arrived.

Anyways, I wanted to know if the whole process I described above, is, like the norm?  I had a girl contact me before about a different project, and she never replied back to me.

Also, about a week or so ago, I got an e-mail from a director in Texas who wanted to film the same short (that the Flordia filmmaker is hopefully going to follow through and film) and I broke it to him I had a contract with a different director.

So, basically, he asked if I had anything else in that genre and I eventually ended up sending another of my shorts.  And it's been four days since I sent him the script.

I'm just paranoid because I'm so young and I just want all this stuff to follow through and I don't want to be taken on by anybody.  I also don't think it's a good idea for me to be sending them e-mails for updates everyday.

-- Curt


"No matter what you do, your job is to tell your story..."

Short scripts

GONE
(6 pages, drama/thriller)
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Toby_E
Posted: June 4th, 2013, 5:05am Report to Moderator
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Curt,

From my experience of sending stuff to my friends stateside, it can take anywhere from 7-14 working days for packages to arrive.

And don't be fazed by people taking a while to reply. I've worked with people before who have had an aversion to constant, up-to-date contact; yet, the project we've worked on still came together fine.


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irish eyes
Posted: June 4th, 2013, 6:40am Report to Moderator
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Curt

Your stuff can get held up in customs for random checks..

That can take a while, that's from experience.

Mark


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dogglebe
Posted: June 4th, 2013, 7:38am Report to Moderator
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When someone wants to film one of my shorts, I give them the following conditions:

1.  I get sole writing credit
2.  I make all changes in the script, or they're done with my approval
3.  I get two copies of the finished work on DVD
4.  The director keeps me advised as what's happening
5.  I retain the rights to my script


Phil
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AmbitionIsKey
Posted: June 5th, 2013, 5:07am Report to Moderator
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Phil, I'm sort of followed all your conditions.

I asked for sole writing credit, and any changes to the script had to be done through me with my permission.  I asked the director to keep me up to date.  And that the rights to the script belonged to me.

I didn't ask for two hard copies though.  Maybe when the short is made, I will inquire.

Anyways --

I've had two e-mails from another Texas filmmakers who wants to make one of my shorts, I think it's going ahead, these are the latest e-mails:


Quoted Text
Hey Curtis,

So sorry I haven't gotten back to you, it's been a little bit crazy on my end.
I did receive the email and script and its amazing. I'd love to take on this script. I'm sending it over to my producers so we can start a breakdown of it.

Once we get a breakdown I'll send over an agreement right away.

Let me know if there's any questions or concerns.

Thanks,
Kevin


I asked what "breakdown" and "producers" involved/meant exactly, and then --


Quoted Text
Hey yeah no worries.

Are you ok with a Skype conference call? Maybe we can strike out some questions so we don't have to keep going back and forth with emails.

Just let me know.


So, was wondering to get advice off you guys.  A guy suggested to me that because this guy has "producers" I should be getting at least some money for this short, but nothing about pay has come up yet.  I haven't mentioned it to him, and really, all I am excited about is getting a writing credit and having my stuff on-screen -- getting paid doesn't really bother me.  I wanted to get your guy's opinions...

Also, I told him I'm free this weekend, and we just need to work out a time for the call.  I hope he doesn't look down the camera, see a 16 year old, and then want to back out.  So, fingers crossed on this one!

-- Curt


"No matter what you do, your job is to tell your story..."

Short scripts

GONE
(6 pages, drama/thriller)
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dogglebe
Posted: June 5th, 2013, 8:24am Report to Moderator
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Shorts don't make money for anyone.  If the director/producer want to throw a few bucks your way, hey cool!  But don't expect it.  Shorts are generally business cards for the directors, actors and writers.  


Phil
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AmbitionIsKey
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Yeah, I thought that myself.  I've never expect money off a short.  But a friend said maybe because this dude has "producers" I should inquire it.

I don't really care about money.  It's the writing credit I want, and the hope that a director will follow through until completion.

-- Curt


"No matter what you do, your job is to tell your story..."

Short scripts

GONE
(6 pages, drama/thriller)
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Toby_E
Posted: June 5th, 2013, 9:49am Report to Moderator
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Nah, just because he's got a producer, doesn't mean there's money involved. I'm working with a producer at the minute on The Only Boy In The World, but no-one's getting paid. The producer is just making it all happen.


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Athenian
Posted: July 13th, 2014, 7:42am Report to Moderator
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Hello everyone,

Yesterday I got an email about my micro-short "Curiosity", but I had already given my permission for its use (to a film student), so I denied. What would you do in such cases?

BTW, let me thank the people who run SS for the great exposure they provide to the writers. And I'm just a newbie here.

Manolis
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LC
Posted: July 13th, 2014, 8:17am Report to Moderator
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Manolis, did you tell the film student he could have it exclusively? Has an agreement/contract been signed? If not you can let the other guy or even another guy film it too. It's up to you how you set the terms unless it's 'optioned' exclusively or where money or a contract is involved. Least that's my understanding.


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irish eyes
Posted: July 13th, 2014, 8:52am Report to Moderator
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Manolis

As long as you haven't sold the rights, your script belongs to you. I gave permission to 5 different companies for one of my shorts, only one produced in the end. So if you want a better chance of it being made don't be afraid to give it out to other people.

In other words you can give permission to whom you like. Once money exchanges or it's optioned(which is kind of rare for a short) then it belongs to them.

This is Phil's rules which I use also :
1.  I get sole writing credit
2.  I make all changes in the script, or they're done with my approval
3.  I get two copies of the finished work on DVD
4.  The director keeps me advised as what's happening
5.  I retain the rights to my script

Good Luck

Mark


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Athenian
Posted: July 13th, 2014, 9:35am Report to Moderator
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Thanks for the advice, Libby and Mark! There was not any contract. The truth is, I wouldn't have given my permission to the second guy anyway (I didn't like the samples of his work I saw), but I was wondering how I should handle such cases in general.

If I may ask another thing, when a script is considered adapted? I had my script "In the nick of time" translated in Portuguese and slightly modified (some dialogue was added, but the story is exactly the same) and the man asked my permission for this adaptation. I've already agreed, but what kind of writing credit do you think I should get?

Thanks for your time and help!

Manolis
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Dustin
Posted: July 13th, 2014, 10:56am Report to Moderator
Of The Ancients


Action speaks louder...

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Original Story by...

That's the credit I believe you will get.


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Athenian
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Quoted from Dustin
Original Story by...

That's the credit I believe you will get.


Thanks, Dustin, it doesn't hurt to know a few basic things.
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ChrisBodily
Posted: July 1st, 2016, 7:10pm Report to Moderator
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I just got an email today from someone claiming to be a startup called yourfilm.buzz


Quoted Text
Subject: Your un-filmed script

Si ce bulletin ne s'affiche pas correctement, veuillez cliquer ici.

Dear Chris,

Do you have a compelling screenplay? Join yourfilm.buzz, the first social network dedicated to film projects. On yourfilm.buzz, you publish your story so it gets to meet the audience first!

Yourfilm.buzz is open to everybody: experienced writers and young talents, emerging artists, film school students, movie professionals, but also movie fans, cinema lovers, TV series addicts Ė the people who are your audienceÖ

Itís simple: sign up and upload your script with a pitch and a synopsis. yourfilm.buzz publishes scripts for feature films, TV series and documentaries in English, Spanish, French and German.

Once your project page is online, all members can chat with you, comment and share. If they want to see your story on the screen, they vote for it. yourfilm is also an international movie production company, so the more votes a project gets, the closer it comes to going into production. Help yours make it to the silver screen!

Click HERE
     
yourfilm.buzz
     
to join! Itís free and thatís the way it will stay.

Best regards,

Daniel Anton, CEO yourfilm

[Facebook] [Google+]

Veuillez cliquer ici pour se dťsinscrire avec votre adresse email suivante: [My email address]

Attachments: Part 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 (all 1KB)


I Googled these guys, and six out of the first ten results seem to have anything to do with yourfilm.buzz (and one appears to not be in English). I don't know if these guys are legit or not. But they appear to be based in Lyon, France. There's also a (possibly unrelated) yourfilm.com that's based in Newcastle, UK.

Just putting this out there for everybody to see. I'd keep an eye on these guys.


FADE IN:
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Dustin
Posted: July 2nd, 2016, 2:12am Report to Moderator
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I got that email too... I just ignored it. It's exactly the same model as Stage 32... what's the point?


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AnthonyCawood
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Yep I got it too... I've uploaded a short and I'll upload a couple more and see what happens (if anything).

Their model does seem to be different to Stage 32 so there may be room for it... but only time will tell.

I'll keep people posted if anything happens.


Anthony Cawood - Award winning screenwriter
Available Short screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/short-scripts
Available Feature screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/feature-film-scripts/
Screenwriting articles - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/articles
IMDB Link - http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6495672/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1
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eldave1
Posted: July 2nd, 2016, 10:33am Report to Moderator
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Same email for me - I just deleted


My Scripts can all be seen here:

http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts
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rendevous
Posted: July 2nd, 2016, 12:18pm Report to Moderator
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Away

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Oh my. So many posts... So little time. We are all dying. I did on stage last night. Again.

In the comedic, sort of Oooh Dear tough crowd kinda way. It was going well. Then the hecklers... basrstards... started.,..

What is wiv all the dots? I do wonder.

Now, the question is this. Will they delete me? Eh?

What day is it? Where am I? How are you? The last question is the most relevant.

You can be whomever you want. Carnegie Hall? Really? I just wanna sing and dance and speak in the pub or the bar without the fools shouting shite. I didn't my people (locals) would let them. I was wrong, Fool me once.

Next time I shall get on the dog. And chew a bone. Literally.

Film is metaphor. Cinema is often allegory. Read Ancient Greece. Look up the Romans. The roamers. Roam, if you feel it's all good. And it's a beautiful day. TO you I mean.

Oops. Me so lazy. I can't even be arsed correcting my text,

Not on here. My angels watch. They are everywhere... Aren't you?

You wanna write stories? In script form? Screenplays. Oops. There is a queue. Oh dear. It is getting longer ever fecking day.

Oh yes.

However, if you write a story even Mr. or Mrs Hollywood says "wow" to then, hey. Who knows?

I tell myself the above sentence every single day of my miserable anonymous life. Me? I'm a shitkicker from nowhere with practically nuthin... But... I dream. Every single day. Write. Write it. Post it. Check it. Check it again. Don't post until you are certain, righter. Er, writer. Learn.

This place feels safe to me. I have been wandering these boards for years. Oh yes.

You wanna write? Do it. I cannot help you more here. Or you could PM me. Or a Mod. Me... I more rocker.

Now... I'll be on the beaches. Watching the tide. The Mods may turn up. What, again>

Oops. They are in charge. We nod to each other near the Cliff. A bloke called Richard, or was it Bette sez Hey

What? From a distance.

I can hear summat. Shyite I forgot about me cooker.

Be good. No, be better than everybody else. Tall order. But you can. Try it. I do.

Rv ox


Out Of Character - updated


New Used Car

Green

Right Back

The Deuce - OWC - now on STS

Other scripts here
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Wes
Posted: July 3rd, 2016, 11:23am Report to Moderator
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Great thread. Looking forward to following it.

The first script I posted, Bar Code Scan, which was pretty much slammed by the community (and rightly so), was picked up by a young film student. She was at some private christian college and had to cut any cuss words. Including "damn". I saw the finished product. Hopefully her professor was the only other person on earth to ever see it.

I understand I'm writing shorts here. I'm not going to make any money. But I have, at least, learned that I need to engage the person who wants to film the script. What's the budget? well, nothing. Okay, what are you doing to find actors? Camera? Lighting?

I know that they are going to have nothing. But if they explain to me that they are going to use the library book check-out stand as a grocery I may have second thoughts about allowing them to use the script.


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ChrisBodily
Posted: May 2nd, 2017, 10:54pm Report to Moderator
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I got an email a few days ago about Bigfoot in Love, which, you might remember, I wrote for the urban legend OWC.

The producer, based in Arizona, is named Joseph Muhammad of Gold Mind Films, LLC.
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2444070/

He has two films in post-production:
Into the Dark (short)
ZELL (feature)

Cancelled Kickstarter for Into the Dark (Looks like they found funding elsewhere)

Gold Mind Films has an official site, a FB and a Twitter. I've been on the fence while I've vetted this guy. He seems legit enough. Should I dive in?


FADE IN:
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AnthonyCawood
Posted: May 3rd, 2017, 1:33am Report to Moderator
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Go for it, hopefully he'll make a great job of it!


Anthony Cawood - Award winning screenwriter
Available Short screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/short-scripts
Available Feature screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/feature-film-scripts/
Screenwriting articles - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/articles
IMDB Link - http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6495672/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1
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NickZing
Posted: May 23rd, 2017, 8:45pm Report to Moderator
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I was contacted by a representative of a production company about selling the IP for my "Dancing in Circles" script that's on this site. The rep' would like to know my price. I have no idea how to proceed in this matter. Can someone give me an idea how to proceed?
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NickZing
Posted: May 23rd, 2017, 10:18pm Report to Moderator
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Thank you. I hope so too. I'm pretty excited, either way, it's a step in the right  direction.
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AnthonyCawood
Posted: May 24th, 2017, 9:14am Report to Moderator
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Nick - did you answer a now deleted thread or a private message?

Anyhow, that's a pretty unusual request, nearest I've had is when someone bought one of my short scripts to turn into a feature but didn't need me to write it. I sold it for more than any other short before or since and built in a bonus when it got made (it still hasn't).

I'd ask them exactly what rights they are wanting to acquire as a starter for ten and what they intend to do with it.


Anthony Cawood - Award winning screenwriter
Available Short screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/short-scripts
Available Feature screenplays - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/feature-film-scripts/
Screenwriting articles - http://www.anthonycawood.co.uk/articles
IMDB Link - http://www.imdb.com/name/nm6495672/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1
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NickZing
Posted: May 24th, 2017, 3:17pm Report to Moderator
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I received an email.
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