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SimplyScripts Screenwriting Discussion Board    Screenwriting Discussion    Screenwriting Class  ›  Studying movies scenes Moderators: George Willson
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Zoe
Posted: September 19th, 2019, 1:37am Report to Moderator
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How do you know when a scene starts and end in a movie? I how to spot  the major beats but it is the scenes I have trouble with. Any tips and advice. Also, are there any movies for a beginner screenwriter to study from? And how do you take notes while watching movies?


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Matthew Taylor
Posted: September 19th, 2019, 3:17am Report to Moderator
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I've always thought of a scene as being a continuous action in a single location. If one of these changes then it's a new scene. Although someone with more technical knowledge may correct me.

I don't take notes so can't help with that - But generally, I will watch movies similar to the one I am currently writing. I also find reading the scripts more helpful than watching the actual movies, but sometimes I will read the script and then watch the movie (or vice versa) to get a feel of how words are translated on screen.


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Dreamscale
Posted: September 19th, 2019, 11:53am Report to Moderator
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As Matthew said, but also make sure time is involved.

This may help...

https://screenwriting.io/what-constitutes-a-scene/



To ski or not to ski...that's not even a question.
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Zoe
Posted: September 19th, 2019, 2:58pm Report to Moderator
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Thank you both for the tips.
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eldave1
Posted: September 19th, 2019, 8:05pm Report to Moderator
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Agree with Both Matthew and Jeff


My Scripts can all be seen here:

http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts
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LC
Posted: September 20th, 2019, 5:07am Report to Moderator
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Zoe, all good advice given by the others. I just want to add (in case you're not aware) A-Z Simply Scripts movie scripts & the SS Blog home page.

https://www.simplyscripts.com/movie-scripts.html
https://www.simplyscripts.com/

Don also posts nominated screenplays during award season.

It's important to remember when you download Pro scripts they're often Shooting scripts so for the most part don't copy their formatting which can include scene numbers etc.

Pro scripts are great to read as a learning tool and for inspiration, but they're not Spec scripts.


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Lon
Posted: September 20th, 2019, 9:15pm Report to Moderator
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The most common indication that a scene has ended in a movie/tv show and a new scene has began is when there's a change in time and/or location.  In a screenplay, it's when a new slug line appears.  There are exceptions, of course (there always are) but these are typically the case.
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Lightfoot
Posted: September 23rd, 2019, 6:54pm Report to Moderator
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I agree with all the above posts about the time/change of scene.

Sometimes though I will go by the point of the scene. If the scene starts out in one location and then goes through to other locations but with no change in the characters goals then I will group it all together as one scene.

It may not be the correct way to view scenes but I think when a scene's point changes some aspect of the story, then that is the end of a scene.
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Lon
Posted: September 24th, 2019, 3:59pm Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Lightfoot
Sometimes though I will go by the point of the scene. If the scene starts out in one location and then goes through to other locations but with no change in the characters goals then I will group it all together as one scene.


What you're referring to is called a sequence -- a string of scenes that collectively act as one part of the overall story.  Danny Ocean recruiting his team, Captain America and the gang executing the time heist, Dread Pirate Roberts hunting down and defeating individually the three men who abducted Buttercup, etc.  Not to be confused with a montage or series of shots.
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