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SimplyScripts Screenwriting Discussion Board    One Week Challenge    February 2011 One Week Challenge  ›  February OWC Theme and Genre are... Moderators: Angry Bear
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Angry Bear
Posted: February 19th, 2011, 10:58pm Report to Moderator
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It's not the law Julio, but if you don't want anyone to produce it without your knowledge, it's a good idea to add that.


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Dreamscale
Posted: February 19th, 2011, 11:04pm Report to Moderator
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Or just add some lingo that states, "If anyone fucks with me or this script, there will be Hell to pay, and I'm not just fucking around..."

Pia, what's up?  My life is turning around again!  I'm starting to exude again...and that's always a dangerous thing...


To ski or not to ski...that's not even a question.
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RayW
Posted: February 19th, 2011, 11:23pm Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Dreamscale
Or just add some lingo that states, "If anyone f~cks with me or this script, there will be H3ll to pay, and I'm not just f~cking around..."


Oh, h3ll yeah!
I'm putting EXACTLY that on my submission!



Just for anyone's edification that doesn't know where the heck The Isle of Man is or Brittany from Britain:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_nations
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shetland

Bean Sidhe - Irish, banshee, (neutral) wailing old woman of the hills.
Bunadh beag na fairrage - (neutral)  Irish, fairies of the sea.
Fetch - Irish, (neutral) a wraith or disembodied ghost of a living person.

Leanan Sidhe - Isle of Man, (malevolent) a vampiric female spirit, muse of poetry.
Lliannan She - Isle of Man, (neutral) a spirit female fairy friend who waited to encounter and follow a man always, invisible to others.

Muryans - Cornish, (neutral) souls of ancient heathen people, too good for hell and too bad for heaven, dwindled until the size of ants. Also shape-changers and that after each time they changed, they became a little smaller.

Anthropophagi - English, (malevolent) headless cannibals.
Darrant - English, (malevolent) a malevolent water spirit.
Lambton Worm - old english, (malevolent) an eel-like 'dragon'.
Sea Witches - British, (malevolent) phantoms, or ghosts of the dead with supernatural powers to control seamen's fate on the waves.

Baobhan Sith - Scottish, (malevolent) beautiful White Women ghost-like vampires.
Bean Nighe - Scottish, (neutral to beneficial) the hideous old washer woman at the Fords.
Bogeyman - Scottish, (malevolent) vague and amorphous in appearance and they resemble a large puff of dust.
Death-Bell - Scottish, (neutral) a tinkling in the ears to announce the death of a friend.
Fear Liath More - Scottish, (mostly scary, potentially malevolent) the Grey Man, associate with Bigfoot, Sasquatch or the Yeti. Also vast, dark blurs which obscure the sky, strange crunching noises, echoing footsteps which pursue the listener, an icy feeling in the surrounding atmosphere, as well as a physical feeling of a cold grip on, or brush against, the observer's flesh.
Shellycoat - Scottish, (prankster)bogeyman who haunts the rivers and streams. He is covered with shells, which rattle when he moves, announcing his presence.
Urisk - Scottish, (beneficial) a solitary Scottish elf who lives in remote pools and rivers.

Selkie - Shetland, (beneficial) marine creatures in the shape of a seal, female can shed her skin and come ashore as a beautiful woman.

Angau - Welsh, (neutral) personification of death, not an actual being.
Bendith Y Mamau - Welsh, (malevolent) ugly fairies of interbreeding between goblins and fairies. Parent of Crimbils.
Cadair Idris - Welsh, (beneficial) the old giants.
Gwragedd Annwn - Welsh, (beneficial) Water-spirits, lovely creatures are known to choose mortal men as their husbands.

Corrigan - Brittany, (malevolent) druidesses fairy malicious towards Christian priests.

Gnome - France, (beneficial)  a race of small, misshapen, dwarf-like creatures that dwell in the earth in some way related to goblins and dwarfs.
Goblin - France, (mostly scary, potentially malevolent) a more grotesque variety of gnomes.

Doppleganger - German, (potentially malevolent) frightful image seen at the window or staring back from the mirror, could be your own--a double.

Osschaert - Belgian, (beneficial or malevolent) a spirit beneficial to good Christians but punished the wicked and forced many into the path of righteousness.

Dyeduska Vodyanoy - Russian, (malevolent) 'Water-grandfather' shapechanger.

Sirens - Greek, (malevolent) three dangerous bird-women, portrayed as seductresses who lured nearby sailors with their enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island.

Aswang - Philippine, (malevolent) body possessing spirit, ugly old woman

Pop - Thai, (malevolent) fearsome ghosts able to possess a human being and feed on the intestines. Also a female ogre who feeds on human intestines and/or the blood of animals at night.






Revision History (2 edits; 1 reasons shown)
RayW  -  February 20th, 2011, 8:54am
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dkfrizzell
Posted: February 19th, 2011, 11:46pm Report to Moderator
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Page 3 and coming along nicely


"You've got to remember that these are just simple farmers. These are people of the land. The common clay of the new West. You know... morons." - Blazing Saddles - Jim AKA The Waco Kid


1 completed, 2 more under construction:
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Dreamscale
Posted: February 20th, 2011, 12:38am Report to Moderator
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Ray, my man...you've just saved me countless hours of research...not that I won't do any, but you've given me a place to start.  Thanks, man!  Seriously...thanks!!!

I'm HAMMIED!!!!!!!!


To ski or not to ski...that's not even a question.
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RayW
Posted: February 20th, 2011, 1:00am Report to Moderator
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You're always welcome, Gene!
I mean Jeff. Jeff!

And you know I always bring snipers to knife fights, so...

http://www.pantheon.org/areas/folklore/folklore/articles.html

Angau - In early Welsh tradition the personification of death.
http://www.celtnet.org.uk/gods_a/angau.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropophagi
Anthropophagi - In English lore, headless cannibals. They have a little brain located near their reproductive organs, their eyes are in his their shoulders and their mouths are in the center of their chests. The were made popular by William Shakespeare in Merry Wives of Windsor (1602) and Othello (1605), but were part of English lore before that.
http://www.lizaphoenix.com/encyclopedia/anthropophagi.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aswang
Aswang - The awang are the most feared of supernatural creatures on the Philippines. They can enter the body of a person and through this person they inflict harm on those the they dislike. Most common are the female variety who appear as an ugly old woman with long, unkempt hair, blood-shot eyes, long nails, and a long, black tongue. She has holes in her armpits which contain oil. This gives her power of flight.
A being of enormous power, she can transform herself into any shape, even inanimate objects. She preys on children, pregnant women, and ill people. Once she has overpowered a victim, she will take a bundle of sticks, talahib grass, and rice or banana stalks, and transform these into a replica of her victim. This replica is sent home while she takes the real person back with her. Upon reaching its home, the replica will become sick and die. The victim will then be killed and eaten. She is said to be particularly fond of the liver.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baobhan_Sith
Baobhan Sith - The White Women of the Scottish highlands. These women are ghost-like vampires who assume the shape of beautiful women and invite men to dance with them, and drink their blood.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bean_Nighe
Bean Nighe - The Bean Nighe, the Washer at the Fords, is the Scottish version of the Irish Bean Sidhe (Banshee). She wanders near deserted streams where she washes the blood from the grave-clothes of those who are about to die. It is said that Bean Nighe are the spirits of women who died giving birth and are doomed to do this work until the day their lives would have normally ended.
A Bean Nighe is thought to have one nostril, one big protruding tooth, webbed feet and long hanging breasts. A mortal who is bold enough to sneak up to her while she is washing and suck her breast can claim to be her foster-child. The mortal can then gain a wish from her.

The Washer of the Fords is sometimes known under the generic name of ban nighechain (little washerwoman) or nigheag na h-ath (little washer at the ford).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bean_Sidhe
Bean Sidhe - In Irish folklore, the Bean Sidhe (woman of the hills) is a spirit or fairy who presage a death by wailing. She is popularly known as the Banshee. She visits a household and by wailing she warns them that a member of their family is about to die. When a Banshee is caught, she is obliged to tell the name of the doomed.
The antiquity of this concept is vouched for by the fact that the Morrigan, in a poem from the 8th century, is described as washing spoils and entrails. It was believed in County Clare that Richard the Clare, the Norman leader of the 12th century, had met a horrible beldame, washing armor and rich robes "until the red gore churned in her hands", who warned him of the destruction of his host.
http://www.lizaphoenix.com/encyclopedia/banshee.shtml

The Bean Sidhe has long streaming hair and is dressed in a gray cloak over a green dress. Her eyes are fiery red from the constant weeping. When multiple Banshees wail together, it will herald the death of someone very great or holy. The Scottish version of the Banshee is the Bean Nighe.

Aiobhill is the banshee of the Dalcassians of North Munster, and Cliodna is the banshee of the MacCarthys and other families of South Munster.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bendith_y_mamau
Bendith Y Mamau - The Bendith Y Mamau ("The Mothers' Blessing") is a rather unpleasant clan of Welsh fairies. They are ugly creatures, and sometimes regarded as the result of interbreeding between goblins and fairies. They steal children and substitute them for their own ugly ones, called Crimbils. Through the intervention of a witch, the parents can regain the stolen child, who will remember nothing of its time with the Bendith Y Mamau, except for a vague recollection of sweet music.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bogeyman
Bogeyman - A malevolent creature from folklore. Some of them are merely troublesome and rather harmless, but others are truly evil. They are shapechangers, who can move objects and cause disruptions. Although a bogeyman usually haunts a family, it in some cases can become friends with them and a playmate for the children. The bogle is a more evil type of bogeyman, although it usually harms only liars and murderers.
The bogeymen are vague and amorphous in appearance and they resemble a large puff of dust. A bogeyman can be spotted by quickly looking through a knothole in a wooden partition. If a bogeyman is on the other side, one might catch the dull gleam of his eye before he has time to move away.


Bunadh beag na fairrage - The Irish name of the fairies of the sea. The name means "family/host of the sea."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadair_Idris
Cadair Idris - In Welsh, Cader means chair and Idris is the name of one of the old Welsh giants. Legend has it that anyone who passes the night in this 'chair' will either be a poet or a madman.


Corrigan - In the folklore of Brittany, a female fairy. She is said to have been one of the ancient druidesses, and therefore malicious towards Christian priests. Corrigan is fond of pretty human children, and is usually blamed for all changeling substitutions.


Darrant - A malevolent water spirit that inhabits the River Derwent (Derbyshire, England). He lurks in the pools, awaiting unwary strangers who venture too close to the water's edge, grabbing and drowning them. He can be compared with Peg Powler and Jenny Greenteeth.


Death-Bell - A tinkling in the ears, supposed by the Scottish peasantry to announce the death of a friend.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divination
Divination - Diviners ascertain their interpretations of how a querent should proceed by reading signs, events, or omens, or through alleged contact with a supernatural agency, most often describe as an angel or a god though viewed by Christians, Jews and Muslims as a fallen angel or demon.[4] Divination can be seen as a systematic method with which to organize what appear to be disjointed, random facets of existence such that they provide insight into a problem at hand. If a distinction is to be made between divination and fortune-telling, divination has a formal or ritual and often social character, usually in a religious context, as seen in traditional African medicine; while fortune-telling is a more everyday practice for personal purposes. Particular divination methods vary by culture and religion.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doppleganger
Doppleganger - The frightful image seen at the window, or staring back from the mirror, could be your own--a double, or doppelg?er (from the German for "double goer"), the sight of which could foretell your own imminent demise. Sometimes described as the soul embodied, sometimes an astral projection or aura, the double most often presented itself as a warning.
Queen Elizabeth I reportedly saw a vision lying on her deathbed, pale and still, soon before she died. Goethe and Shelley also claimed to have seen their doubles, and when Catherine the Great of Russia saw her own coming toward her, she took no chances and ordered her soldiers to shoot at it. Witches, it was long accepted, could project their own doubles and set them loose to do mischief far and wide. As a result, many a women was hanged as a witch even though it could be proven beyond a shadow of a doubt that she was somewhere else entirely when the barn burned down, the cow died or whatever else had happened that she was now charged with having done. On other occasions, a double -- of someone else - -could be called forth or seen.

One old Halloween custom has it that if a young girl lights two candles before a mirror, while eating an apple, she will see in the mirror the spectral image of her future husband, peering back at her as if from over her shoulder. If she is brave enough to venture out to a graveyard, and walk all the way around it twelve times, she will meet up with the double itself.
According to another old belief, anyone who wants to know who will pass away in the coming year has only to stand vigil near the church door on April 24, the eve of the feast day of St. Mark. At midnight, the airy doubles of all who will die file in a solemn processional into the church, if the watcher is unlucky enough to see his own image there, he knows his own time is not far off.

To this day, the fear of the double is observed, if unknowingly, in the custom of covering all the mirrors in a house where a death has just occurred. The double of anyone passing the glass, it was once thought, could be projected into the mirror and carried off by the deceased to the afterworld.


Dyeduska Vodyanoy - The Russian 'Water-grandfather'. He is a powerful shapechanger and it is believed that he drowns those who swim at twelve o'clock, be it midnight or noon. He often marries drowned or disinherited girls, but he also has a liking for happily married women. Each time a woman is about to give birth to a child of his, he will go to the nearest village to request the services of a midwife, who will be handsomely rewarded in gold and silver.
The Watermaster can be recognized by his bald head, large belly, round cheeks and his green clothes. He wears a high, pointed hat made of reed. However, he also appears in the shape of a handsome young man or a well-known person from the village. He lives in rivers, pools and lakes, preferably close to a water-mill. He hides during the day as a trout or an old salmon, but during the night he emerges from the water to let his sea cows and sheep and horses graze on the meadows. Sometimes he can be seen sitting on the river bank combing his long, green hair and beard.

On the land he has little power, but in his natural element the water he is all-powerful. It is believed that he hibernates during the winter. When he awakens in spring he crushes the ice in the rivers and pushes large chunks up the river banks. He enjoys destroying mill-wheels, but when he is in a benign mood he guides the fish into the nets of the fishermen or warns against floods.

His daughters, pale and tall and dressed in green, torture the drowned. They like to sit on tree branches, rocking slightly, while singing beautiful songs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear_liath
Fear Liath More - the Grey Man, is a creature said to have inhabited the vicinity of the summit cairn of Ben MacDhui, one of the six great peaks of the Scottish Cairngorm Mountains, for generations. The Grey Man is identified as a presence encountered both physically and psychically. In its physical form, the Grey Man is most often described as quite large and broad shouldered, standing fully erect and being in excess of 10 feet in height, with long waving arms. He is also reportedly olive complected or, alternatively, covered with short brown hair. Because of this, some tend to associate him with the Bigfoot or Sasquatch of North American fame, or the Yeti of the Himalayas. Footprints found on the summit of Ben MacDhui do closely resemble the "typical" Bigfoot imprint. However, this association is misleading, as the Grey Man has far more interesting identifying characteristics than his physical description alone.
More frequently, the Grey Man is encountered in physical sensation, but without a true physical form. Sensations of this type include vast, dark blurs which obscure the sky, strange crunching noises, echoing footsteps which pursue the listener, an icy feeling in the surrounding atmosphere, as well as a physical feeling of a cold grip on, or brush against, the observer's flesh. There is also a high pitched humming sound, or the Singing as it is sometimes called, which is associated with Ben MacDhui and the Grey Man.

Additionally, the Grey Man has an extremely powerful psychic effect. Visitors to Ben MacDhui report a feeling of overwhelming negative energy. Occasionally this is described as extreme lethargy and despondency. More often, it is typified by acute fear, apprehension and an overwhelming panic, leading to suicidal thoughts or physical flight from the area. Generally, this fear is accompanied by the physical sound of echoing footsteps chasing the observer, and sometimes the sound of a resonant and yet completely incomprehensible voice which seems to be faintly Gaelic in nature.

Curiously, the Grey Man has a distinct area of influence. At a certain point in their downward flight all observers report that the negative energies and feelings of fear end as abruptly as they began. The Grey Man has most often been encountered within this century by mountaineers climbing in the Cairngorms. He has also been described in several books, including Affleck Gray's The Big Grey Man of Ben MacDhui and F.W. Holiday's, The Goblin Universe.



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RayW
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fetch_(folklore)
Fetch - A wraith. The disembodied ghost of a living person. They most commonly appear to distant friends and relations at the very moment before the death of those they represent. Fetch-light or fetch candle is a light appearing at night and which supposedly foretells someone's death.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnome
Gnome - A race of small, misshapen, dwarf-like creatures that dwell in the earth. The name 'gnome' was given to them by the medieval scholar Paracelcus, in an attempt to describe the most important of the earth spirits. Gnomes live under the earth, where they guard treasures. According to Paracelcus, they move as easily through the earth as humans walk upon the ground. They cannot stand the light of the sun, for even one ray would turn them to stone. Some sources claim they spend the hours during daylight as a toad. They are in some way related to goblins and dwarfs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goblin
Goblin - Goblins are a different, more grotesque variety of gnomes. They are known to be playful, but at other time they are evil and their tricks could seriously harm people. A goblin smile curdles the blood and a laugh sours the milk and causes fruit to fall from the trees. They pester humans in a number of ways, such as hiding small objects, tipping over pails of milk and altering signposts.
Goblins originated in France and spread rapidly all over Europe. They have no homes and usually live in mossy clefts in rocks and roots of ancient trees, although they never stay very long in the same place. The name 'hobgoblin' is thought to be an abbreviation of 'Robin Goblin', the name Druids gave to the first goblins when they entered Britain.
http://www.lizaphoenix.com/encyclopedia/goblin.shtml

Gwragedd Annwn - Water-spirits from Wales. These lovely creatures are known to choose mortal men as their husbands. One legend has it that they live in a sunken city in one of the many lakes in Wales. People claim to have seen towers under water and heard the chiming of bells.
In earlier times, there used to be a door in a rock and those who dared enter through it came into a beautiful garden situated on an island in the middle of a lake. In this garden there were luscious fruits, beautiful flowers and the most lovely music, besides many other wonders. Those brave enough to enter were welcomed by the Gwragedd Annwn and were invited to stay as long as they wanted, on the condition that they never took anything back from the garden. One visitor ignored the rule and took a flower home with him. As soon as he left the island, the flower disappeared and he fell unconsious to the ground. From that day on, the door has been firmly closed and none has ever passed through it again.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hand_of_Glory
Hand of Glory - the dried and pickled hand of a man who has been hanged, often specified as being the left (Latin: sinister) hand, or else, if the man were hanged for murder, the hand that "did the deed."

According to old European beliefs, a candle made of the fat from a malefactor who died on the gallows, virgin wax, and Lapland sesame oil - lighted and placed (as if in a candlestick) in the Hand of Glory, which comes from the same man as the fat in the candle - would have rendered motionless all persons to whom it was presented. The candle could only be put out with milk. (In another version the hair of the dead man is used as a wick, also the candle is said to give light only to the holder.) The Hand of Glory also purportedly had the power to unlock any door it came across.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambton_Worm
Lambton Worm - The Lambton 'Worm' (old english for 'dragon') has long been part of folklore in Durham, England. The 'worm' began wreaking havoc in the middle ages, when a young member of the Lambton family caught an eel-like creature while fishing on a Sunday. He threw it down a well, where it grew to an enormous size. When the youth went off to on a crusade, the worm escaped the well and devoured anything that came near. It is said that the worm was long enough to wrap itself around the hill, now called "worm hill", completely three times, and it slept wound around the hill in this manner.
The young man managed to kill the worm upon his return from the crusades -- cutting the worm in three pieces -- but only with the help of a witch. His promise to her was that he would kill the first creature he met after his victory. Unfortunately, the first creature he met happened to be his father. Unable to murder his father, the young crusader reneged on his promise to the witch and condemned his family to a curse of untimely deaths that continued for nine generations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leanan_Sidhe
Leanan Sidhe - On the Isle of Man, the Leanan Sidhe is a vampiric female spirit, while on in Ireland she is the muse of poetry. Those who are inspired by her usually live a glorious, but short life.

http://everything2.com/title/leanan+sidhe?lastnode_id=404524
Lliannan She - In the Isle of Man, a spirit friend, a female fairy who waited to encounter men. If one spoke to her she followed him always, but remained invisible to everyone else.


Moran's Collar - In Irish folklore, the collar of Moran, the wise councillor of King Feredach the Just. The collar strangled the wearer if that person deviated from the strict rules of equity.


Muryans - The Muryans (Cornish for "ant") are believed to be the souls of ancient heathen people, too good for hell and too bad for heaven. Their size gradually dwindled until they were the size of ants, after which they vanished and no one knows what became of them. Another traditions tells that the Muryans were shape-changers and that after each time they changed, they became a little smaller. In Cornwall it was considered unlucky to kill ants.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necromancy
Necromancy - a form of magic in which the practitioner seeks to summon the spirit of a deceased person, either as an apparition or ghost, or to raise them bodily, for the purpose of divination.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occult
Occult - Occultism is the study of occult or hidden wisdom (forbidden knowledge). To the occultist it is the study of "truth", a deeper truth that exists beneath the surface: "The truth is always hidden in plain sight". It can involve such subjects as magic (alternatively spelled and defined as magick), alchemy, extra-sensory perception, astrology, spiritualism, lithomancy, and numerology. There is often a strong religious element to these studies and beliefs, and many occultists profess adherence to religions such as Gnosticism, Hermeticism, Luciferianism, Satanism, Thelema, and Neopaganism.

The word occult is somewhat generic, in that almost everything that is not claimed by any of the major religions can be considered the occult.


Osschaert - A spirit which haunted the town of Hamme, near Dendermonde in Belgium. The spirit was apparently beneficial to good Christians but punished the wicked and forced many into the path of righteousness. His usual abode was a place where the chapel of Twee Bruggen now stands. He would clamber on the shoulders of those who passed through his territory and carry him around until the bearer arrived at a crossway over which the spirit was unable to pass or when they encountered an image of the Virgin Mary. Those who had a heavy burden on their conscience suffered the most of Osschaert's riding for he pressed them with an intolerable weight and struck his claws deep into their flesh, burning their necks with his hellish fiery breath.

A pious priest, concerned about the misery inflicted by the spirit on his flock, resolved to drive him away by exorcism. The spirit was banished for ninety-nine years to the sea-shore.


Pop - The phi Pop are fearsome ghosts from Thai folklore. They can possess a human being and feed on the intestines. They can be expelled by a spirit doctor who performs a "whirlpool dance." The ghost, watching the dance, is sucked into the whirlpool and is thus removed from the body.
The legend of this ghost originated with a prince who found a magical way to enter the body of another living person or animal. When he performed this feat and entered the body of an animal, his servant, who had been listening to the magic words, repeated the incantation and entered the body of the prince. The prince, unable to return to his own body, transferred to that of a bird and flew to his wife to tell her what had happened. She immediately had the servant's body destroyed and challenged the false prince to enter the body of an animal. When he did, the real prince quickly re-entered his own body. The servant, unable to return to his body, is since then forced to going from one body to the next, eating the intestines.

The phi Pop is also said to be a female ogre who feeds on human intestines and/or the blood of animals at night.


Sea Witches - For centuries stories of sea witches have predominately enhanced British folklore. The tales are believed by many in the sea faring trade. Allegedly these beings, which have been described as phantoms, or ghosts of the dead supposedly have the supernatural powers to control seamen's fate on the waves. Sea witches are still believed to lurk up and down the coast ready to scuttle ships upon the rocks, and cause them to founder in storms.
In legend Sir Francis Drake is said to have sold his soul to the Devil in order to become a skilled seaman and admiral. The Devil allegedly sent Drake sea witches, who raised a storm which helped him to defeat the Spanish Armada in 1588. The area where the battle occurred near Devil's Point, overlooking Davonport, is still believed to be haunted by witches.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selkie
Selkie - The shy Selkies are marine creatures in the shape of a seal. They can be found near the islands of Orkney and Shetland. A female can shed her skin and come ashore as a beautiful woman. When a man finds the skin, he can force the Selkie to be a good, if somewhat sad, wife. Should she ever recover the skin, she will immediately return to sea, leaving her husband behind. The male Selkies are responsible for storms and also for the sinking of ships, which is their way of avenging the hunting of seals.
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art22774.asp
http://www.newinfo2day.com/freaky/folklore-and-mythology-selkies/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shellycoat
Shellycoat - The Shellycoat is a Scottish bogeyman who haunts the rivers and streams. He is covered with shells, which rattle when he moves, announcing his presence. He enjoys misleading wanderers and often puts them on the wrong track. The Shellycoat is playful, but rather harmless. Generally, the creatures who inhabit rivers are less dangerous than those who live in lakes and seas.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirens
Sirens - three dangerous bird-women, portrayed as seductresses who lured nearby sailors with their enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island.
http://www.lizaphoenix.com/encyclopedia/siren.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urisk
Urisk - The Urisk is a solitary Scottish elf who lives in remote pools and rivers. He is friendly and likes the company of humans, but his curious appearance usually scares away those he approaches.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_o_the_wisp
Will O the Wisp - Will-o'-the-wisps are the faint lights seen on marshes and bogs on still nights after sunset. Usually a soft bluish light, but also reddish or greenish in appearance. In folklore, they are thought to be imps or pixies leading victims to danger in swamps and heaths. Sometimes they are believed to be the spirits of stillborn children flitting between heaven and hell.
It is also known as Jack O'Lantern, Peg-a-Lantern, Friar's Lantern, Spunkie, Fox Fire, and Walking Fire. The classical name for this phenomena is Ignus Fatuus ("fools fire").

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witches
Witches - use supernatural or magical powers to inflict harm upon members of a community or their property.




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RayW  -  February 24th, 2011, 8:26am
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Baltis.
Posted: February 20th, 2011, 1:17am Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Dreamscale
OK...if Balt's out, then so am I!!!!!  But then again, that could be just a stupid, lame, age-old trick to throw you guys off.

Then again, I highly doubt Balt is out.  I sure hope not.

Drinking heavily once again and heading to my new Hot Tub...well, not mine exactly, but I guess I got to look at the perks of apartment living...yeah, I know, there are some for sure...just to many fucking people all around me.

Balt, don't bail, my friend.  I KNOW you can and WILL write a KICK-ASS script for this OWC.  And...I will too, damnit!

C'mon peeps!!!!!!


I wish you well, Jeff.  I do mean that too...  In all aspects, not just your writing endeavorers.  I hope you're getting settled back into AZ and your life takes the shape you want it to.  Sooner rather than later.

I'll no doubt be keeping an eye out for your script in the challenge... But I do believe I'm out at this point.  The story I'm most passionate about of the ideas I spun is too dependent on children, 1 in-particular and another to a lesser degree.  I feel it will make a damn fine entry into some contest coming up this year to be sure.

I've got 4 scripts, 2 features and now 2 shorts I'm pushing this year.  Been sitting back pecking away, polishing and restructuring 3 of these for some time now and it's time I get with it or get gone.
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bert
Posted: February 20th, 2011, 2:52am Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Baltis.
But I do believe I'm out at this point.


Ah, c'mon Balt.  I thought you were in.

Even I've got one cooking this time -- as the late-night inspiration has finally hit -- and I think there's even a fair chance I'll post this one up, too.

How often do we get to play with straight-up horror in the OWC?

I'll be less inspired knowing you won't have a script in the mix for me to trounce.

(And the trash-talking commences...)


Hey, it's my tiny, little IMDb!
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Dreamscale
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I hear you, bro...I really do...but c'mon, man...Balt, we need you here!  We really do.

Thanks for the warm sentiments.  I'm getting by now finally and it feels good.  Jump in here with whatever you come up with.  I'm willing to bet that whatever you put together...it will be great and well received.

I hope to start thinking about this tomorrow...I'm way too hammied to think about it now...and I'm watching some low budget dreck called Staunten Hill.  Doesn't look very promising...


To ski or not to ski...that's not even a question.
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mcornetto
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What I want to know is why are all of these creatures women?
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RayW
Posted: February 20th, 2011, 4:07am Report to Moderator
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What I want to know is why are all of these creatures women?

If I had to take a wild sociology guess, it's a combination of extensive trade traveling during male-centric times these were "observed" making up entertainment for the folks back home, so of course there were lotsa either monsters or beautiful women - and - the males swere likely intoxicated a fair bit of the time so they could blame their mishaps on this trickster or beguiling spirit.

"I'm not guilty, honey! That succubus tricked me".
"Uh huh".

Why'd they crash their ship into the rocks?
Bad captain or helmsman?
Nah. Investors don't wanna hear that.
Blame it on the sirens.

"So, tell me more about why you fell into the creek".
"Uh... I was walking along mindin' my own p's and q's and a darrant reached out and tripped me!"
"Uh huh. And how many p's and q's had you had at that point?"
"Uh... um.... "




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RayW  -  February 20th, 2011, 8:26am
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RayW
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Quoted from Ryan1
Speaking of low budget English horror...

http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_.....he-loch-ness-monster



I see your monster and raise you a sturgeon.
http://www.google.com/images?q.....-m3&aql=&oq=




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wannabe
Posted: February 20th, 2011, 12:33pm Report to Moderator
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@ Michael - This one could be either:  "Anthropophagi - English, (malevolent) headless cannibals."    
I had to Wiki that one up because I couldn't figure out how you could be headless AND a cannibal.  LOL.   They use the old face in the chest trick.  Sneaky.
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DarrenJamesSeeley
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Quoted from Sandra Elstree.


I believe I remember reading that's out. No animals either.

Sandra


Wouldn't fish, crabs, snails etc be an exception? Or at least *dead* fish, crabs and snails?
And where does that leave the Questing Beast ?

In fact- one of the selected is like an eel, correct?


"I know you want to work for Mo Fuzz. And Mo Fuzz wants you to. But first, I'm going to need to you do something for me... on spec." - Mo Fuzz, Tapeheads, 1988
my scripts on ss : http://www.simplyscripts.net/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1095531482/s-45/#num48
The Art!http://www.simplyscripts.net/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-knowyou/m-1190561532/s-105/#num106

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